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Posted on: April 8, 2021

Blog: CITY COUNCIL WORK REGULAR MEETING: Tuesday, April 6

Montrose, CO — City Councilors met for their regular meeting Tuesday evening, April 6, to select a new mayor for the 2021-2022 term and consider a business expansion incentives package for the Colorado Yurt Company’s new headquarters, new liquor licenses, and a number of resolutions, ordinances, and contract awards. 


The council met in chambers Tuesday for the first regular meeting since the November 3, 2020, meeting due to the COVID-19 restrictions. City Councilors Roy Anderson, Dave Bowman, Barbara Bynum, Dave Frank, and Doug Glaspell met in person along with limited city staff. The public was also invited to attend via the Zoom platform. The following is a summary of the primary topics discussed during the meeting. 


Watch the meeting here.


APPROVAL OF MINUTES


Councilors voted unanimously to approve the minutes of the March 11 and March 15 special City Council meetings, and the March 16 regular City Council meeting. The city’s archive of past meeting minutes can be found at CityofMontrose.org/ArchiveCenter.


ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF OUTGOING CITY COUNCILOR


Mayor Barbara Bynum, along with fellow councilors, thanked councilor Roy Anderson for his years of service to the Montrose community and presented Anderson with a plaque recognizing his time on the City Council. Anderson was the city's mayor during the 2018-2019 term. Anderson is stepping down from the council effective April 7 due to a family illness. 


SELECTION OF MAYOR AND MAYOR PRO TEM


City Councilor Doug Glaspell was selected as the new mayor of Montrose, succeeding Barbara Bynum, for the 2021-2022 mayoral term. Councilor Dave Frank was selected by the council to become the new mayor pro tem.


Although city councilors are elected by the public to fill four district seats and an at-large seat, the mayor and mayor pro tem are selected by the council as defined by the City Charter as a home rule municipality under the Colorado Constitution. 


A roll-call vote of all city councilors was conducted to confirm both appointments. 


PRESENTATION TO MAYOR


Barbara Bynum was presented with a plaque celebrating her year as the city's mayor. Mayor Pro Tem Doug Glaspell said Bynum’s service “has really moved the community along.”


“She’s been helping this community ever since she got here,” Glaspell said. “And this last year has really been a rollercoaster.” 


COLORADO YURT BUSINESS EXPANSION PROJECT INTO THE COLORADO OUTDOORS URBAN RENEWAL AUTHORITY PROJECT AREA


City Councilors voted unanimously to approve a proposal by Colorado Yurt Company to build its new headquarters within Colorado Outdoors with the help of several incentives.


Colorado Yurt Company is looking to build a 30,000 square-foot manufacturing and office space building on nearly 3.4 acres in Colorado Outdoors. 


The cost of the entire campus development is projected at nearly $6.9 million, which includes a "display village" along the city's Connect Trail and a public/private use restroom on the north end of the river trail. 


Developers John and Kelly Gibson of the Colorado Yurt Company are looking to break ground this summer. The project has a goal to create new jobs in Montrose with a plan to have 37 to 60-plus employees within three years, adding five jobs to the community with a salary of $70,000 while increasing the average salary of employees from approximately $39,638 to $50,000 by 2023. 


John Gibson addressed the council Tuesday, stating there is huge potential for growth in the outdoor/recreation industries and that an expansion of the business is unavoidable.


According to Gibson, when they purchased the 45-year-old Colorado Yurt Company about one year ago, the business was a well-respected manufacturer of yurts, tipis, and tents with customers in multiple markets around the world. However, growth had stalled and company culture was struggling. When the Gibsons started “Colorado Yurt Company 2.0” in January 2020, they saw nothing but opportunity to grow, innovate, be involved in Montrose, and make the company the best place to work. They inherited a strong team with plenty of underutilized talent. In a year with the challenges of COVID, including supply chain disruptions, freight issues, and economic uncertainty, the business has thrived. Sales are up 45 percent, employees are engaged, customers are excited, and the company is becoming an active contributor to the Montrose community.  


All indications support continued growth in outdoor recreation, hospitality, and experience‐based commercial businesses. Colorado Yurt Company is uniquely positioned to meet the needs of current and emerging consumer and commercial markets with the selection and quality of structures it offers. Manufacturing innovation is in progress. New materials, product development, streamlined systems, improved employee engagement, and enhanced training will guide product manufacturing in the future.  


To achieve this vision, Colorado Yurt Company needs a new space. The current facility is not adequate for current company needs and has no potential to accommodate growth. In addition, the current facility does not showcase the company’s reputation and professionalism. There are no buildings that currently fit the desired size/zoning/location requirements to achieve upcoming growth in Montrose. 


Colorado Yurt Company envisions a destination site that would represent the future for Colorado Yurt Company and Montrose. In addition to a manufacturing facility, the project includes an outdoor display village nestled into the existing trees along the Uncompahgre River. The display village would combine a walk-by experience for visitors along the trail with a “try before you buy” overnight rental experience for potential customers. The village will be a destination, with guides available on the weekend to give tours and engage guests. The Gibsons envision a place where employees would be proud to work, where innovation happens, where the best of Montrose is showcased, and where visitors and the community are welcome.


Potential MURA/City Of Montrose Investment:


• Estimated City of Montrose Building Permit Fee Waivers - $105,000 (City Manager Approved)

• Estimated “Made in Montrose, Colorado” Marketing Assistance - $30,000 over 3 years (Office of Business & Tourism)

• Estimated Water and Sewer Connection Fee Abatements - $29,065 (Pending City Council Approval)

• Estimated Horizontal Infrastructure/Non‐Building Site Improvements - approximately $853,935 (TIF Anticipatory Borrowing to be repaid to MURA and city through property taxes generated by the project)


NEW TAVERN LIQUOR LICENSE - WILD HORSE WINE AND WHISKEY, LLC


City Councilors unanimously approved a new tavern liquor license at 439 East Main Street for Wild Horse Wine & Whiskey LLC for consumption on the licensed premises. 


The council held a public hearing before voting to approve the license.


NEW LODGING & ENTERTAINMENT LIQUOR LICENSE - PRECEDENCE PRODUCTIONS


City Councilors unanimously approved a new lodging and entertainment liquor license at 511 East Main Street for Precedence Productions for consumption on the licensed premises.


The council held a public hearing before voting to approve the license.


ORDINANCE 2530 - SECOND READING


City Councilors unanimously approved Ordinance 2530 on second reading, which will vacate three city right-of-ways within the former Russell Stover candy factory property.  


Councilors held a public hearing before holding a roll-call vote. 


ORDINANCE 2531 - SECOND READING


City Council vote unanimously to approve Ordinance 2531 on second reading, amending the zoning district designation of Lot 1 of the Stover Minor Subdivision Property Rezone Map from "P" Public District to "I-1" Light Industrial District, and Lot 2 and Lot 3 of the Stover Minor Subdivision Property Rezone Map from "P" Public District to "B-2" Highway Commercial District.


Senior City Planner Amy Sharp said the ordinance is to rezone the Stover property located at 2190-2200 Stover Avenue and consists of approximately 27.2 acres. The company executed its right to purchase the property when the company left Montrose in 2020 following 38 years of operation under a land lease agreement with the city. Following the sale to Russell Stover, the city was obligated to rezone the property because the Public District zoning no longer applied, according to Sharp. 


Councilors held a public hearing, with no members of the public offering any comment, before recording a unanimous vote. 


VALLEY RANCH ADDITION NORTH ANNEXATION


City Council voted unanimously to approve both Resolution 2021-05 and Ordinance 2532 for the annexation and associated zoning of the Valley Ranch Addition North.

The Valley Ranch Addition North is a proposed annexation of approximately 60.81 acres. The parcel is located north of Otter Road, south of Ogden Road, west of 6700 Road, and east of 6630 Court. It is within the city’s urban growth boundary, the City of Montrose Water Service Area, and the City of Montrose Sewer Service Area. Annexation of this property will allow for future residential development.


ORDINANCE 2533 - FIRST READING


City Council voted unanimously to approve Ordinance 2533 on first reading, zoning of the Valley Ranch Addition North as "R-3A" Medium High-Density District and "R-2" Low-Density District. 


Councilors will vote again on the second reading of the ordinance at the April 20 meeting. 


VALLEY RANCH ADDITION SOUTH ANNEXATION


City Council voted unanimously to approve both Resolution 2021-06 and Ordinance 2534 for the annexation associated zoning of the Valley Ranch Addition South.


The Valley Ranch Addition South is a proposed annexation of approximately 70.16 acres. The parcel is located north of Otter Road, south of Ogden Road, west of 6700 Road, and east of 6630 Court. It is within the city’s urban growth boundary, the City of Montrose Water Service Area, and the City of Montrose Sewer Service Area. Annexation of this property will allow for future residential development.


ORDINANCE 2535 - FIRST READING


City Council voted unanimously to approve Ordinance 2535 on first reading, zoning the Valley Ranch Addition South as "R-1" Very Low-Density District. 


Councilors will vote again on the second reading of the ordinance at the April 20 meeting. 


HIGHWAY 50 ADDITION ANNEXATION


City Council voted unanimously to approve both Resolution 2021-07 and Ordinance 2536 for the annexation associated zoning of the Highway 50 Addition. 


The Highway 50 Addition is a proposed annexation of approximately 15.04 acres. The parcel is located along Highway 50, west of 6700 Road, and east of 6600 Road. It is within the city’s urban growth boundary, the City of Montrose Water Service Area, and the City of Montrose Sewer Service Area. Annexation of this property will clean up an ‘orphaned’ parcel of land bordered on three sides by existing city parcels.


ORDINANCE 2537 - FIRST READING


City Council voted unanimously to approve Ordinance 2537 on first reading for the zoning of the Highway 50 Addition "B-2" Highway Commercial District.  


Councilors will vote again on the second reading of the ordinance at the April 20 meeting.


ORDINANCE 2538 - FIRST READING


City Council voted unanimously to approve Ordinance 2538 on first reading, amending the rezoning of Lot 1 of the Cedar View East Minor Subdivision from "R-6" Medium Density/Manufactured Housing District to "B-3" General Commercial District. 


Councilors will vote again on the second reading of the ordinance at the April 20 meeting.


ORDINANCE 2539 - FIRST READING


City Council voted unanimously to approve Ordinance 2539 on first reading to vacate a right-of-way along North Second Street within the city limits. 


The proposed vacation is located along N 2nd Street. Part of the existing house at 127 N. Lot Avenue encroaches into the N 2nd right-of-way. The owner has requested that the city vacate a 12’ x 150’ strip of land (approximately 1800 sq. ft.) along the N 2nd right-of-way.


This portion of N 2nd Street dead-ends into Paseo del Arroyo Park on the west side. The city would retain an 88-foot-wide ROW, which is sufficient for the street and sidewalks. The right-of-way vacation would have the additional benefit of allowing enough buildable area for two or three new lots under the REDO and Subdivision Regulations. 


The amount of land proposed for vacation would place the entire house on private property. If approved, the resulting lot would be 150’ x 62.5’ in size (9375 sq. ft.). The vacated portion of the right-of-way will be combined into the existing lot by an administrative process.


Councilors will vote again on the second reading of the ordinance at the April 20 meeting.


ASBESTOS ABATEMENT CONTRACT AWARD


City Council voted unanimously to approve a contract award for asbestos abatement in a structure at 931 North Park Avenue to Acumen Environmental Services in the amount of $95,682. 


Public Works Manager Jim Scheid said the building was previously the Powderhorn Industries building and was recently purchased by the city. After evaluating the structure and its systems, it was determined that the most cost-effective approach for creating a site that will suit the needs of a transit center is to remove the existing structure and start with a clear site. The asbestos abatement is the first step in making that happen, followed by the removal and disposal of the remaining metal buildings on the site.


Scheid said the cost of the abatement work was higher than normal due to the amount of asbestos to be removed, along with the difficult type of abatement work. 


The contract amount of $83,203 includes a $12,480 contingency. Acumen Environmental Services of Glenwood Springs was the lowest bidder from among eight bids the city received. 


The abatement of this structure supports the effort to help relocate the All Points Transit center to a location that will better suit the needs of the community and the surrounding region. It is the staff’s understanding that the council may consider using undesignated fund balance reserves to complete this project.


PAVEMENT MARKING CONTRACT AWARD


City Council unanimously approve a contract award for pavement marking to Stripe a Lot of Montrose for the not-to-exceed amount of $135,000. 


The city’s Streets Division contracts the striping of city streets. The contractor will stripe all streets that require striping at least once per year and all crosswalks, stop bars, arrows, etc as needed. The contractor will also apply a preformed plastic coating at all roundabouts or other high-traffic areas. This type of application will be completed at least once per year but will be applied again as needed at some locations. 


The city’s pavement marking contract expired earlier this year and an RFP was issued to renew the contract and allow for competition in the award process. The Streets Division received one bid. Stripe a Lot submitted a qualified bid meeting all of the bonding and insurance requirements. 


The bids are submitted in a price-per-unit format based on an estimated quantity that the city provided for comparison purposes. In this case, there are no other bids to compare to their proposal, except the pricing from previous years. There has been a price increase of approximately 5% from last year. 


The supply chain that provides the resins and acrylics to make the pavement marking products has been interrupted and the plants that generate this material are expecting significant delays in fulfilling orders. Due to these constraints, this item is being approved through an accelerated process.


STAFF REPORTS


Public Works Manager Jim Scheid said the city is preparing for the annual Spring Clean-up on April 30 and May 1. More information can be found at CityofMontrose.org/SpringCleanup.


Police Chief Blaine Hall thanked the council and public for attending the groundbreaking ceremony for the new Public Safety Complex Monday. The event was well attended and the online live video was watched many times.


CITY COUNCIL COMMENTS


Mayor Pro Tem Dave Franks said the Montrose Rotary Club celebrated 100 years of work within the Montrose community helping with many civic projects and issues. 


•••


All City Council meetings are recorded and made available online via the city’s website and cable channels 191 for Charter subscribers and 970 for Elevate subscribers. Replays of council meetings are also broadcast at 6 p.m. on the same channels on days that the council is not in session. 


In addition, each regular meeting is archived on the City of Montrose’s YouTube channel


Residents can watch all regular City Council meetings and work sessions live through the city’s website at CityOfMontrose.org/Video


For more city news visit CityOfMontrose.org.

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