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Posted on: October 22, 2018

Seven Appointed to City’s New Historic Preservation Commission

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Montrose, CO – City Councilors welcomed seven members to the City’s new Historic Preservation Commission appointing them to three-year terms to study matters related to historic preservation efforts within the city. 


Montrose area residents Ian Atha, John Eloe, Jon Horn, Amanda Lloyd, Michael J. Prouty, Robert (Bob) S. Stollsteimer and Scott Stryker were approved Tuesday evening Oct. 16, during the council’s regular meeting. 

 

The commission will also conduct surveys and create inventories of historic sites, properties, and areas for the purpose of defining those of historic, local significance. The commission will also determine qualifications of buildings, structures, objects, sites and districts nominated for designation.


Members of the Historic Preservation Commission serve at the pleasure of the City Council and are appointed for three-year overlapping terms. Meeting times and dates have not yet been established. 


In July, councilors unanimously approved a new ordinance to update the city's municipal code to give owners of historic downtown buildings the choice to pursue historic designation for their properties. This allows the city to partner with property owners to pursue efforts towards preserving historic downtown buildings and investment in economic revitalization.


According to members of the City Council, there is no greater, more beautiful reminder of the history of Montrose than the historic buildings of this city's downtown. These structures tell the story of the founding, creation, and growth of Montrose and serve as the cornerstone of the city's legacy for the future. 


Chelsea Rosty, the Director of Business Innovation for the City of Montrose, delivered several presentations to the council earlier this year showcasing multiple projects from across the country, including Colorado, highlighting historic buildings being restored and used for modern uses. 


“The amount of expertise, local history, and concern for preservation in these seven individuals is a gold mine. It is incredible having such high caliber individuals as part of this new preservation movement,” Rosty said.


The ordinance passed in July allowed the City to pursue status as a Certified Local Government, or CLG, to have the ability to designate buildings as part of the City's own historic registry. Up until then, the City of Montrose was the largest Colorado community without a CLG ordinance. 


When a building was to be registered for HP, the building's owners would then be eligible to apply for tax credits and other incentives from both state and federal programs for the preservation and restoration of their buildings. 


The HP ordinance is written to allow building owners the option to apply for designation. The designation is not mandatory for downtown building owners but serves as a tool for them to pursue preservation efforts. The ordinance states once a building is designated a historic property, that designation stays with the building permanently. The program is designed for buildings that are 50 years and older. 


Once an application is received, the new commission will work to determine if the proposal fits within the HP ordinance. If approved the project would have to follow certain policies when altering the property that closely follows local and state preservation guidelines. Each project would be subject to financial review to determine if the project could qualify for city investment.  


For more information about the commission visit: www.cityofmontrose.org/history.


For more city news visit: CityOfMontrose.org.


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